How to care for your plants! Your guide to success with Succulents, Cactus, Houseplants, & Air Plants

Below you will find our practical guides to caring for plants. We do a general coverage of all types of plants (succulents, cactus, air plants & houseplants) because when you break it down, most plants share many of the same basic needs of water, temperature/humidity, food and lighting. Contact us with any questions about a specific plant and its required care.

Succulent & Cactus General Care Guide

Water

Succulents and Cactus prefer the “Soak and drought” method of watering. When the soil is completely dry, give them a good watering until the soil is saturated and draining. Wait until the soil completely dries out again before watering.

  • Use a moisture meter to determine if your succulent or cactus really needs water.
  •  In Spring/Summer/Fall plan to water at least once per week depending on the size container your plant is in. In Winter you can plan to water 2 times per month. If your succulent is indoors, use drip trays under pots with holes to catch any excess water and protect your home and furniture from water damage. 
    • Use caution when dealing with succulents in potted arrangements without drain holes, watering needs to be more closely monitored as it will take longer to dry in between waterings.

Temperature & Humidity

  • Succulents generally do not like humidity or cold temperatures. 
    • The ideal succulent temperatures are between 60-80F degrees. 
      • Blushing will occur when temperatures reach around and over 90F degrees. Be sure to protect your succulent from direct sunlight exposure in the heat as it may burn the leaves.
      • Be sure to protect your succulents from freezing temperatures, either bring them inside the house, or if too big to bring inside, cover them with an insulating blanket to protect them from frost/snow.
    • We use humidity/temperature readers to monitor the room for us, which makes it easy to have an at-a-glance view of what’s going on.

Light

  • Succulents thrive with bright-indirect light and as much as they can get. Certain varieties prefer more shady environments and others can easily sunburn in afternoon direct sunlight.
    • If your succulent is not receiving enough light it will tell you by beginning to stretch- or become etiolated. Since you cannot undo this stretch, you can get your plant to more light and let it grow on, rotating it every week or so for even growth, or you could cut the top off and replant the succulent head and try again. 

Food

Fertilize succulents in early spring and mid-summer with a ½ strength fertilizer.

Airplants General Care Guide

Water

Do not use distilled or filtered water as there are few nutrients or minerals in these water sources; use rainwater or spring/creek water instead. We set out water containers filled with tap water a day before we water to allow for any chemicals to dissipate before we use it the following day.

  • For cone-based air plants & xerographicas: soak in room temperature water for 30 minutes to an hour. Be sure to shake out excess water and allow it to fully dry before returning it to its home.
  • For bulbous-based air plants: soak in room-temperature water for 30 minutes once per week. Only soak the leaf-ends and leave the base/root-end sticking out of the water. Any water that is left in the base of these plants causes them to rot, shake out any excess water! Allow them to fully dry before returning them to their home.
    • Air Plants should be dry within 3 hours of soaking them. If they are not, be sure to place your plant in a drier location with circulating air.

Temperature & Humidity

Air plants prefer to live in temperatures of 65-85F degrees with humidity levels around 65%. 

  • We use humidity/temperature readers to monitor the room for us, which makes it easy to have an at-a-glance view of what’s going on. 

Light

Air Plants love bright, filtered light and lots of it. Minimum 8 hours of light per day or more to stimulate growth. 

Food

Tillandsia plants don’t require fertilizer to grow as they are receiving minerals in their water baths, however, you can. 

  • At the beginning of spring and mid-summer is the best time to feed them- use fertilizer at 1/4 strength in the soaking water.
  •   We use our homegrown worm castings with all of our air plants. To use: depending on how much water you are using; soak ½ tablespoon for every ½ gallon.

Pro-Tip

Schedule out “long soaks” for your plants that extend beyond the normal 30 minutes to hour range- typically 1-2 hours is fine for small tillandsias and 4-8 for large. Do this process once a month in the Spring & Summer.

General Houseplant Care Guide

Water

Houseplants is such a large category of plants that it’s hard to generalize watering care for them all, however, most houseplants prefer moist soil with much higher humidity levels, especially compared to succulents & cactus. 

  • Never allow houseplants to sit in water or have excessively moist soil. The roots need to breathe to grow, this allows for the soil to dry a little between waterings.
  • We use drip trays under pots with holes to catch any excess water and protect your home and furniture from water damage. 

Temperature & Humidity

Ideally, the temperature in your space should be between 60-75F degrees with 50-60% humidity to grow your houseplants.

  •  In Winter, caution of the changes your home experiences- heater vents may blow air on your plants drying them out faster than normal, or plants on window sills freeze behind closed curtains.
  • To raise humidity: Mist plants with room temperature water, or use pebble trays under the plant pot with water in them. 
  • We use humidity/temperature readers to monitor the room for us, which makes it easy to have an at-a-glance view of what’s going on. 

Light

As with watering, houseplants enjoy a variety of light levels depending on the species. Find the place in your home that best provides the light requirement for your specific plant.

  • Whether you set up a lighting system or use your window space and natural lighting from your home, most plants need 8 hours of light a day to survive.
  • Most plants experience leaf burn when they are left in direct sunlight. Be cautious of leaving plants in window areas in the Spring & Summer months.

Food

Fertilize your houseplants once every month or per quarter, however, this schedule generally changes in the fall/winter months.

  •  We use our homegrown worm castings with all of our plants which provide slow release food to the plant over a few months. To use: Apply worm castings directly to the top of the soil and water normally.

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